Part 1: Why I decided to wear a continuous glucose monitor as a non-diabetic physician 

2018.09.11 Continuous Glucose Monitoring, Washington, DC USA 1285
My constant companion, with a 1″ needle embedded in my triceps muscle for 10 days. 2018.09.11 Continuous Glucose Monitoring, Washington, DC USA 1285 (View on Flickr.com)

I am not diabetic or pre-diabetic (at least I didn’t think so). Or hypertensive. Or overweight (however, I am a formerly fat person). And I decided to wear a continuous glucose monitor (see photograph above).

Why?

  • I have been learning more about diabetes prevention & reversal (something that was never taught to us in the 20th Century)
  • I have been understanding the impact of diabetes and metabolic disease in ways I never did before, for a few reasons:
    • In the 20th Century, the percentage of adults with diabetes was 2.5 percent. Now it’s 12 percent, and headed to 30 percent – it’s all around us
    • I am interacting with people with diabetes and specifically people who have reversed their diabetes
  • I don’t feel myself as a person and as a member of the medical profession that we’ve been as empathetic as we could be, especially in the setting of risk factors that we now know are partially of our creation, and reversible
  • I am not a technology for technology’s sake person, however I do see potential in understanding my glucose regulation (or dysregulation) as significant. I’d say a lot more significant to my health than knowing my ECG tracing, for example.

How Was It?

I’m grateful for the experience. I am awed at how much we take for granted when it comes to metabolic health, and what it means if it’s deranged. Everything from the work of knowing and acting, to existing in society (“what’s that on your arm?”). Prior to this era, there was really no economical way to know how our bodies react to food. Studies are now emerging that for the majority of the population, the answer is “not well.” And sadly, most people are unaware:

2018.08.06 Glucotypes reveal new patterns of glucose dysregulation 509
2018.08.06 Glucotypes reveal new patterns of glucose dysregulation 509 (View on Flickr.com)
2018.05.29 Low Carbohydrate Meetup Washington, DC Presentation  454
2018.05.29 Low Carbohydrate Meetup Washington, DC Presentation 454 (View on Flickr.com)

I’m going to post thoughts on the device itself and then my own data, after I have it reviewed by another doctor or two :). Here’s a sneak peek:

2018.09.08 Low Carb and Low Carbon 01-527
2018.09.08 Low Carb and Low Carbon 01-527 (View on Flickr.com)

Stay tuned, open to any questions.

Purchased with my own funds, conflict free is the way to be

A reminder that I have no ties to, nor have I received any gifts, honoraria, meals, from any food, pharmaceutical, device, or diagnostics manufacturer. No health care premium dollars were used to subsidize this expense.

2018.05.29 Low Carbohydrate Meetup Washington, DC Presentation  453
2018.05.29 Low Carbohydrate Meetup Washington, DC Presentation 453 (View on Flickr.com)

And, I’m not the only one doing this:

‘I think the value is unbelievable,’ one entrepreneur told MarketWatch.

Source: Non-diabetics are using diabetes technology to track their blood sugar and improve their health – MarketWatch

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