Transgender Pride Flag Emoji Submission for inclusion in the Unicode Standard for 2018

Updates

Click here to see associated twitter conversations.

Update 5: October 23, 2017

No update from @Unicode yet, just some very interesting conversation about inclusion and language:

I especially appreciate this comment

…because while our proposal has some legitimate technical dependencies, there are other social considerations that come into focus, especially if the other emoji’s that are being proposed are the “heart with knife”, “sad poop” and pirate flag.

All of this said, as it is said, “don’t react, innovate” – important to understand how @Unicode and associated vendors work together and participate, even if we have to learn ZWJ sequences.

I believe Unicode is meeting this week.

And I never imagined that as a family doctor I would be participating in the formation of a language. On the other hand, these things matter for health, and so therefore it’s exactly the right place for a family doctor to be.

Update 4: August 8, 2017

Not approved at this time, appears to be grouped in with other flag proposals for consideration in October.

Recommendations as of August 8, 2017 (via @Unicode)

Primer on ZWJ sequences (for the curious)

Update 3: August 6, 2017

@PinkNews is reporting that the proposal has not been accepted by @Unicode. However, we have not received any communication from the Unicode consortium about this. See the dialogue about this on twitter.

Update 2: July 7, 2017

Thank you again for your proposal. This is just a status-update. The emoji subcommittee needs a larger discussion about how to handle different types of flags. Your proposal is being held with some others pending outcome of that discussion.

Update 1: June 30, 2017

Thank you for your submission. This is to let you know it has been safely received, and will be reviewed by the emoji subcommittee.


Transgender Pride Flag Emoji Submission

Proposal

Emoji Proposal – Transgender Pride Flag – Download (pdf)

As the title of the post says, this is the official submission to Unicode for the Transgender Pride Flag Emoji.

Monica Helms, the creator of the Transgender Pride Flag, is a signatory on the submission 🙂 .

The transgender pride flag signifies visibility in a world that’s learning to love better. A sticker may seem like a small innovation but it means a lot to a community that’s been marginalized.

This year at Capital Trans Pride, we lamented that the only emojis we could send to each other are the rainbow pride flag.

“My reason for wanting a trans flag emoji is so that a trans individual can feel a sense of belonging and visibility when using technology to communicate.”
Bianca Rey (@BiancaRey), Co-Chair, Capital Trans Pride, Washington, DC (Trans Pride Sticker Set Site)

If you don’t like the news, go make your own. Hopefully the news will be good. Feel free to review the submission and provide us with your comments.

More people with health care = more humans living authentically and able to help the world learn to ❤️ better. Isn't this century great? equalitymarch2017 #EqualityEqualsHealth #dc #WeareDC trans.equalityy
More people with health care = more humans living authentically and able to help the world learn to ❤️ better. Isn’t this century great? @equalitymarch2017 #EqualityEqualsHealth #dc #WeareDC @trans.equalityy (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for Publishing my Photograph, in ‘Tel Aviv is veganistische hoofdstad van de wereld’ | isreality.nl

2016.07.10 Tel Aviv People and Places 07017
2016.07.10 Tel Aviv People and Places 07017 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photograph, @IsrealityNL, in this piece linked below.

The photograph was taken in Tel Aviv, Israel, of course. I should also add that while the data shows that Israelis are suffering from many of the chronic health issues brought on by (now faulty) recommendations for a low-fat, high carbohydrate diet, it is still possible/easy to pursue a higher-fat, healthy food mix. I know, because I did.

See for yourself in this photo 🙂 .

2016.07.10 Tel Aviv People and Places 06995
2016.07.10 Tel Aviv People and Places 06995 (View on Flickr.com)

(Translation:

‘Tel Aviv is vegan capital of the world’

With more than 400 vegan restaurants and at least as many fruit bars, according to the British newspaper The Independent, you can no longer ignore it: Tel Aviv is the vegan capital of the world

)

Met meer dan 400 veganistische restaurants en minstens zoveel fruitbarretjes kun je er volgens de Britse krant The Independent niet langer omheen: Tel Aviv is dè vegan capital of the world.   Die titel geeft de Israëlische kuststad zichzelf trouwens al langer, net als veel veganistische toeristen die de stad bezoeken. Toch zijn de meeste eters bij …Source: ‘Tel Aviv is veganistische hoofdstad van de wereld’ | isreality.nl

Thanks for Publishing my Photo, in Why My Girlfriend Doesn’t Get ANY Gifts for the Holidays – Tagg Magazine

2017.06.05 Pride DC People and Places, Washington, DC USA 6059
2017.06.05 Pride DC People and Places, Washington, DC USA 6059 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photograph, @taggmagazine, a favorite Washington, DC institution.

The photograph is of historic JR’s Bar and Grill in Washington, DC, and the first year that the establishment has flown a transgender pride flag. It’s still flying there today. That’s what happens in the capital of a world learning to ❤️ better.

Plus, the advice given is great 🙂 .

At my girlfriend’s request, I have never gotten her a single material item for a holiday. But before you call me a Scrooge, let me explain why.Source: Why My Girlfriend Doesn’t Get ANY Gifts for the Holidays – Tagg Magazine

Thanks for Publishing My Photo, in Records show D.C. Police used an LRAD sound cannon to “direct crowd flow” during the Women’s March

2017.01.21 Women's March Washington, DC USA 00094
2017.01.21 Women’s March Washington, DC USA 00094 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photograph, @MuckRock. And, my reaction is, “Oh dear.” Health is important in all pursuits, including peaceful dissent.

Records released last week show D.C. Metropolitan Police Department employed a Long Range Acoustic Device during the Women’s March to “direct the crowd flow.” This is the latest evidence of an worrying trend in which police departments are increasingly using the incredibly powerful LRAD to deal with non-violent protests at the risk of causing permanent hearing loss.Source: Records show D.C. Police used an LRAD sound cannon to “direct crowd flow” during the Women’s March

Photographs: Transgender Day of Remembrance, 2017, Washington, DC USA #TDOR

2017.11.20 Transgender Day of Remembrance #TDOR, Washington, DC USA 0605
Candidate for Washington, DC ANC3F06, Monika Nemeth @TheMonikaNemeth | 2017.11.20 Transgender Day of Remembrance #TDOR, Washington, DC USA 0605 (View on Flickr.com)

This year, it was standing room only. Because I am working to be an ally, I stood off to the side. There were people with much better cameras, anyway.

In 2017, we have good scholarship that tells us that Transgender Women of Color are Murdered Much More Often, via American Journal of Public Health

Thank you Mayor Muriel Bowser (@MayorBowser), Chief of Police Peter Newsham, (@ChiefNewsham), and Sgt. Jessica Hawkins, of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Liaison Unit (LGBTLU) | mpdc for being present, protecting us, and reaffirming Washington, DC’s commitment and existence as the most protective of human rights in the United States. It’s why we came here.

Rest of the photos are below. All are @CreativeCommons licensed.

Just Read: How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie, and Thoughts on Social Movements

This is a book I can’t believe I haven’t read until now.

It is as highlighted as the other classic I couldn’t believe I read until now, The Effective Executive (Just Read: Peter Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done).

Both are gifts of another book, Tools of Titans (Just Read: Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers, Tim Ferriss).

I’m sure many people have heard the title before and probably learned many of the principles in various other experiences.

I’m not sure how many people have actually read this book or applied its principles.

I encounter many people who don’t apply its principles, and I don’t apply them myself as well I could (another principle, evaluate myself). I hope that I and everyone around me does. The world depends on it.

What’s incredible to me is that the book was written in 1937, and yet contains references to behavioral science that has only recently been understood to be true.

The only disconcerting thing about this particular edition is that it has been “strategically updated” in parts to make it more timely, so next to a conversation about lumber mills there’s one about Walt Disney World or Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thoughts on Social Movements and Changing Old Ideas

In addition to quoting some of the most meantingful passages to me below, I also thought about the work in the context of social movements. These are the times where people are actively not being won over; more the opposite. Where does this fit in with unequal power relationships that result in the human catastrophes that this book describes?

Situations like this:

Or the situation that Tim Noakes (@ProfTimNoakes), physician and scholar describes in his new book Lore of Nutrition: Challenging conventional dietary beliefs (reading that now), replete with professional and academic bullying to an impressive degree. Starting that book right after this one has been a distinct contrast.

Quotes and Commentary

See what you think:

I once succumbed to the fad of fasting and went for six days and nights without eating. It wasn’t difficult. I was less hungry at the end of the sixth day than I was at the end of the second. Yet I know, as you know, people who would think they had committed a crime if they let their families or employees go for six days without food; but they will let them go for six days, and six weeks, and sometimes sixty years without giving them the hearty appreciation that they crave almost as much as they crave food.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 50). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

Remember, this is 1937 – fasting was a fad? Nod to to the present day discarding of old ideas about nutrition developed in the late 20th century.

More importantly, the need for humans to be appreciated and to matter.

Hurting people not only does not change them, it is never called for. There is an old saying that I have cut out and pasted on my mirror where I cannot help but see it every day: I shall pass this way but once; any good, therefore, that I can do or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer nor neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again. Emerson said: “Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.” If that was

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 54). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

Relevant in the scope of arguably the most successful social movements of our time, LGBTQ equality. Time and time again, attempts to hurt or dehumanize fail. It’s why love always wins.

If we want to make friends, let’s greet people with animation and enthusiasm. When somebody calls you on the telephone use the same psychology. Say “Hello” in tones that bespeak how pleased you are to have the person call.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 85). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

This is more personal – people make fun of me because when they ask how I’m doing, I rotate through several phrases, with authenticity:

  • “incredible”
  • “amazing”
  • “never better”
  • “best day of my life”

…because they are true. Try it yourself. They’ll be true for you, too.

You don’t feel like smiling? Then what? Two things. First, force yourself to smile. If you are alone, force yourself to whistle or hum a tune or sing. Act as if you were already happy, and that will tend to make you happy.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 95). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

Also personal. I have learned how to smile, and now I offer 60 second smile-training on demand to people who haven’t learned yet. I haven’t yet met anyone who doesn’t look good in a photograph. The key is smiling.

This policy of remembering and honoring the names of his friends and business associates was one of the secrets of Andrew Carnegie’s leadership. He was proud of the fact that he could call many of his factory workers by their first names, and he boasted that while he was personally in charge, no strike ever disturbed his flaming steel mills.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 104). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

Again, relevant to the most successful social movements of our time. In health care, honoring and respecting people’s names is the most basic part of health care (the verb, not the noun). In this century, this is extended to the use of proper pronouns.

Built for the Future: My business card includes my pronouns

Martin Luther King was asked how, as a pacifist, he could be an admirer of Air Force General Daniel “Chappie” James, then the nation’s highest-ranking black officer. Dr. King replied, “I judge people by their own principles—not by my own.”

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 162). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

This is a reference to respecting one’s adversaries. Maybe out of place, maybe not…

The sun can make you take off your coat more quickly than the wind; and kindliness, the friendly approach and appreciation can make people change their minds more readily than all the bluster and storming in the world.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (pp. 181-182). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

Self evident. Takes as much energy to be kind as it does to be unkind (actually less energy to be kind) 🙂 .

In short, if you want to improve a person in a certain respect, act as though that particular trait were already one of his or her outstanding characteristics. Shakespeare said, “Assume a virtue, if you have it not.” And it might be well to assume and state openly that other people have the virtue you want them to develop. Give them a fine reputation to live up to, and they will make prodigious efforts rather than see you disillusioned.

Carnegie, Dale. How To Win Friends and Influence People (p. 268). Simon & Schuster. Kindle Edition.

This is not just impressive in its truth; also in its prescient prediction of the science that would only emerge 80 years later. This refers to moral self-license, the activity whereby people with inclusive values may at the same time discriminate. What’s been studied is appealing to people’s image of “who I am, versus what I do.” (see: Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care)

The conclusion

Still the same for me.

  • We’re all here to help the world learn to ❤️ better.
  • ❤️ always wins.
  • Embrace curiosity.
  • In health care, I wish these personal and professional conflicts on every nurse and doctor in their lifetimes, so they can re-commit to these principles.

Thanks for Publishing my Photo, BuzzFeed, in Based On Your Wedding Menu Choices, This Is When You’ll Get Engaged

2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01688
2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01688 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for choosing my photograph of a moscow mule, @BuzzFeed & @OnTheRegna for this story that touches on wedding cocktails.

Interestingly, it was taken in the about-to-be-or-in-the-process-of being redeveloped, Ivy City, Washington, DC USA, which I just commented on in my last post: Thanks for Publishing my Photo, Planet Forward, in Ivy City, Washington, DC USA: At the corner of development and gentrification

It’s all important, and I’ll say that not every one of my published photos is of rainbow flags and butterflies 🙂 .

Eat your heart out!Source: Based On Your Wedding Menu Choices, This Is When You’ll Get Engaged

Thanks for Publishing my Photo, Planet Forward, in Ivy City, Washington, DC USA: At the corner of development and gentrification

2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01737
2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01737 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photograph, @Planet_Forward, in this piece written by Connor Nash, from Towson University.

Nash traces the history of Ivy City, in Washington, DC and its future redevelopment plans. The photograph above was taken at the back door of the Murray Hill Club – “backstage” as it were, to changes coming (always go behind the scenes).

I also grabbed a photo of the curiosity that I noticed at the time, which I now understand is the focus of significant dialogue, Crummell School:

2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01683
2017.03.19 Ivy City, Washington, DC USA 01683 (View on Flickr.com)

..in the context of a whole lot of changes that are visible in Ivy City today. See the photographs at the bottom of this post.

There’s an interesting quote from Chris Leinberger (@ChrisLeinberger), where he says

“The research shows that gentrified neighborhoods actually have less displacement than non-gentrified neighborhoods because they want to hang around, things have gotten better, why leave?”

I’m a fan of Chris’ work (and have posted on this blog about it previously), and at the same time, I’m not sure this experience has been borne out in a more advanced neighborhood redevelopment in the Shaw neighborhood, as covered in depth in Derek Hyra’s (@DerekHyra) book:

Thoughts and photos from the gilded ghetto | Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City, by Derek Hyra

Thanks to Connor’s scholarship, I took the time to look up the proposal that’s moving forward, from Ivy City Partners, Ivy City Partners – Crummell School Site Community Presentation | dmped, and a competing one that did not get selected, from Empower DC, Friends of Crummell School – Save Crummell. Review them for yourself, read the article, and see what you think.

The learning for me in this dialogue is that the growth and development of our society is never over. If people reminisce about times when their neighborhood was not so livable, it’s easy, in Washington, DC, to walk a few blocks and try things all over again.

I’m also here to support college scholarship and journalism, which is what Planet Forward does:

Planet Forward, a project of the Center for Innovative Media at the George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs, teaches, celebrates, and rewards environmental storytelling by college students. It is the premier engagement tool for GW’s many sustainability initiatives.

It’s why we’re here, in the learning lab for the nation and world, in Washington, DC. Thanks for the exposure and for the exposure 🙂 .

The Crummell school in the Ivy City neighborhood in Washington, D.C. has decayed over time, turning it into a vacant plot of land. This article dives into the environmental, social, and political struggles to change the school for the better.Source: Ivy City: At the corner of development and gentrification

Photo Friday: We’wha, Astronaut Sally Ride, on the LGBTQ Rainbow Honor Walk, San Francisco, CA USA

2017.11.15 San Francisco People and Places, San Francisco, CA USA 0497
2017.11.15 San Francisco People and Places, San Francisco, CA USA 0497 (View on Flickr.com)
2017.11.15 San Francisco People and Places, San Francisco, CA USA 0486
2017.11.15 San Francisco People and Places, San Francisco, CA USA 0486 (View on Flickr.com)

The photographs above were taken by me in San Francisco, CA this week (I break the rule of Washington, DC only for significant sightings 🙂 ), where I got to see the brand new additions to the Rainbow Honor Walk (@RainbowWalkSF).

I immediately recognized We’wha because I was introduced to them previously via the work of Jerome Pohlen, who used one of my other photographs in his excellent book: Thanks for publishing my photo, in this lovely book: Gay & Lesbian History for Kids, by Jerome Pohlen, and I was delighted and moved to see them immorialized on the sidewalk with other people who have moved humanity forward in time and space, including Astronaut Sally Ride.

The other honorees on the sidewalk will remind generations to come the fact that diversity allows the human species to not just survive, but to thrive. It’s an important message in this part of the world, as you can see from the rest of the photos below. Always remember.

It was also a fantastic experience to walk with colleague Bianca Rey (@BiancaRey) through the landmarks of our LGBTQ past. My life would be less fulfilling if I wasn’t surrounded by these transformational leaders, past, present and future.

Additional photos below of the walk, and other leaders who I regularly call on in the future. Enjoy.

Thanks for Publishing my Photo, in A Right to Marry? Same-sex Marriage and Constitutional Law | Dissent Magazine

SCOTUS APRIL 2015 LGBTQ 54663
SCOTUS APRIL 2015 LGBTQ 54663 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photograph Dissent Magazine (@DissentMag). It’s a very detailed piece written by philospher Martha Nussbaum, PhD, that was actually published in 2009 (I love the ways the things I do are brought to me via social media).

I’m linking to this piece becuase it’s a such an interesting time capsule of thought from a time before even Washington, DC experienced marriage equality (one of the first in the nation to do so, in 2010).

It’s also a wonderful counterbalance to a recent way this same photograph was used, which resulted in the publication’s license being terminated (see: Thanks for removing my photo from your website, TechCrunch, and what a tyrant doesn’t look like)

Dissent Magazine is of course licensed to use the photograph under @CreativeCommons, because it’s being used as intended, to help the world learn to ❤️ better.

I’m also pointing out that in 2009, Martha Nussbaum,PhD and Dissent Magazine knew what was right, because in this situation, knowing what’s right isn’t that hard.

Love always wins.

Marriage is both ubiquitous and central. All across our country, in every region, every social class, every race and ethnicity, every religion or non-religion, people get married. For many if not most people, moreover, marriage is not a trivial matter. …Source: A Right to Marry? Same-sex Marriage and Constitutional Law | Dissent Magazine

Thanks for Publishing my Photo, In Equitable bike share systems: Removing barriers to access – D.C. Policy Center

Center for Total Health Entrance with CTHNext Bikeshare 08285
Center for Total Health Entrance with CTHNext Bikeshare 08285 (View on Flickr.com)

Thank you again, @DCPolicyCenter for publishing my photograph in this excellent and I’ve-been-waiting-a-long-time-for analysis, performed by author Alon Levy (@alon_levy).

The photograph, by the way, was taken in front of my workplace, the Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health (@KPTotalHealth). When the Center for Total Health was built in 2011, there was no complete street on 2nd Street NE, and there was no Bikeshare station. We were gifted with one in June, 2015. Hard to believe it’s only been 2 years, ever since we got one it feels like it has always been there 🙂 .

CTHNext Bikeshare OOB Experience 57806
CTHNext Bikeshare OOB Experience 57806 (View on Flickr.com)

The analysis, though, answers lots of questions that I have had about Bikeshare (@Bikeshare), from reviewing the data from the system as well as scholarly works about the health impact of bike sharing systems (see: Just Read: Bike sharing: review of evidence on impacts including health and equity). What I say/believe is that the other gift that Capital Bikeshare and systems like it gave us is data – we now know better than we ever have how people move through cities.

Challenges

  • Bikeshare is not in the same proportion by different populations – only
  • Decisions made about where stations are placed as well as the geography have huge impacts
  • Being banked or unbanked can put Bikeshare out of reach for many
  • Newer dockless bikesharing may actually make the equity problem worse

A Health Issue as Well as a Transportation One

The fact that we as a community have a desire to know helps us solve problems. One of the best parts of this century is the understanding that transportation is as much a health issue as a transportation one.

Including some quotes below; read the analysis, it’s excellent.

The District is 36 percent white and 48 percent black; counting Arlington and Alexandria, which have extensive Capital Bikeshare service as well, the core is 35 percent black.[2] But a survey from 2016 reveals that 80 percent of subscribers are white (and just 4 percent are black), and 52 percent of subscribers are in households earning more than $100,000 a year.

Based on the services’ initial rollout, it appears that two of the three main problems of bike share equity—outreach and fare payment—are even worse for dockless bike share. There does not appear to be much community outreach, and the fare payment options (which require a bank account and credit card) lock out many low-income residents. In addition, dockless systems also require a smartphone for activation. Smartphone ownership is universal among middle-class Americans, but not among poor Americans: according to Pew Research, only 64 percent of American households making less than $30,000 a year have a smartphone.

Equitable bike share systems: Removing barriers to access – D.C. Policy Center

Source: Equitable bike share systems: Removing barriers to access – D.C. Policy Center