Photo Friday: Brookland, Washington, DC USA – An amazing journey through American History

Photo Friday: Brookland, Washington, DC USA - An amazing journey through American History

Brookland is an amazing journey through African American History and the people who saved thousands of lives through medical science, helped create a Jewish State (Israel), changed entertainment, prevented Washington, DC from being turned into a 12-lane freeway, including most of present day Shaw, U Street, and Dupont Circle. They happened to be African American.
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Thanks for using my photo in, If You Want to be a Trans Ally, Declare Your Pronouns

Thanks for using my photo in, If You Want to be a Trans Ally, Declare Your Pronouns

Thanks for using my photo in this post written by @DaveandTino and I think this is a good analysis.

As I’ve mentioned before, declaring my pronouns happens every time I send an email or give someone my business card. I like to be built for the future 🙂 . Continue reading→

Photo Friday: Signs of Regret (of the Dying), Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: Signs of Regret (of the Dying), Washington, DC USA

Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. “When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently,” she says, “common themes surfaced again and again.” She recorded their dying epiphanies in a book, Five Regrets of the Dying.

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Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 – Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 - Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

It gets better.

This is a 2015 update from Author Daniel Effron at London Business School (@lbs) – and yet another reminder that the business profession has done as much if not more work in the area of behavioral health as the medical profession.

Continuing from the previous post on this topic (Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care), this update adds more information about human motivation.

I’m framing this post through the perspective of bias, but the principles apply to health behavior, consumer behavior, etc….

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Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing - a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Earlier in my career, I remember a colleague saying to me, in a challenge to observed, biased behavior, “this is organization x, those things don’t happen here.” He said it with a dismissive chuckle. And yet, it did happen…

I have been intensely interested in the concept of “Illusion of Objectivity” especially in health care, and so have done a deep literature review, which brought me to this paper and the concept of moral self-license…

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Photo Friday: Lafayette Square, Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: Lafayette Square, Washington, DC USA

Lafayette Square, the site of everything from made-up cocaine purchases to strolls on the way to the future, is this week’s photo. Part of the series below. Enjoy. Continue reading→

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

In some of the work I do, and the work I am doing now, it is a continual source of marvel that some of the most important scholars in a field (you name it) do not have an identity in social media (Do physicians tweet about environmental stewardship in health care?). I give presentations and talks to them about this…and some of them invite me to give them presentations and talks about this (oh, like this one: Dialogue about #hcsm at the 2013 #AAMCJtMtg – Academic Medicine and Social Media).

In this particular space, I think it’s even more critical because from my perspective, even as a physician, it’s not possible to understand the meaning of a published paper without asking questions.

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