What is this Village Thing? Neighborhood Villages & The Gift of a Long Healthy Life

What is this Village Thing? Neighborhood Villages & The Gift of a Long Healthy Life

Washington, DC, leads the nation in something else awesome – senior (neighborhood) villages. I kept thinking of all the other groups who could benefit from villages…

A few people have been educating me about the Village “Thing.” (It’s not a place, it’s a concept – The Pasadena Village)
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Photo Friday: On assignment for UrbanTurf: Healing H Street, NE, Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: On assignment for UrbanTurf: Healing H Street, NE, Washington, DC USA

I don’t do any commissioned work or accept payment for photography (and I didn’t this time either), however, I agreed to do a profile of the H Street NE neighborhood for local metropolitan blog/resource UrbanTurf (@UrbanTurf).

This street is going to look nothing like this in 2 years. It’s now being destroyed for the third time in 48 years (the first was following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.). This version will hopefully be sustainable, inclusive, healthy 👍 👍.

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Thanks for publishing my photo: How five local businesspeople would tackle gentrification on 14th Street

Thanks for publishing my photo: How five local businesspeople would tackle gentrification on 14th Street

Thanks for publishing my photo, Greater Greater Washington (@ggwash), in the attached piece.

The comments on the piece show a diversity of opinions of what people think a changing neighborhood should be and who belongs there.

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Thanks for publishing my photo | U.S. Cities Want To Totally End Traffic Deaths–But There Have Been A Few Speed Bumps | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

Thanks for publishing my photo | U.S. Cities Want To Totally End Traffic Deaths--But There Have Been A Few Speed Bumps | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

I got to meet Leah Shahum (@VisionZeroNet) from Vision Zero Network in January, 2016, This Week in Total Health: Innovation and Transportation Rule the Week | Kaiser Permanente Center for Total Health, where I learned about Vision Zero first hand. Continue reading→

A transgender force (& A Great Leader) – The Washington Post on Ruby Corado

A transgender force (& A Great Leader) - The Washington Post on Ruby Corado

I met Ruby when Casa Ruby (@CasaRubyDC) was just starting, and I remember that day in 2013 very well. Of course there’s a blog post of it: Washington, DC 2013 Sheroes of the Movement, Leadership.

I had no idea what a delicate situation Ruby was in when during this time. She presented a compelling vision for the future even then, which is what a leader does. Continue reading→

You can look at the comments. My experiment in ending transphobia. What you don’t permit, you don’t promote

You can look at the comments. My experiment in ending transphobia. What you don't permit, you don't promote

In social media spaces, the challenge of any platform that you don’t control (Facebook) is that there are things out of your control. Given that situation, I carefully judge where and when I engage in what I call health activism.

Knowing this, I still didn’t expect it, but…it happened.

Ever so subtly and then more apparently, transphobic comments began appearing on the post. Continue reading→

Photo Friday: No Longer Obsolete, Logan Circle, Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: No Longer Obsolete, Logan Circle, Washington, DC USA

As the title of the post says, this neighborhood and the ones surrounding it were deemed “obsolete” by the then The National Capital Park and Planning Commission in 1950, with the recommendation that they be completely be re-faced. (Was your neighborhood “obsolete” in 1950? – Greater Greater Washington). These neighborhoods were supposed to be destroyed by a grand highway (they weren’t). They were supposed to be skipped over for Metro access (they weren’t due to community activism). They were supposed to be neglected by city administrators who lived in places very far away, with different ideas about diversity and inclusion (they were). Continue reading→