The future of LGBTQ rights was born here, too: Vermont Avenue and the Death of Tyra Hunter

The future of LGBTQ rights was born here, too: Vermont Avenue and the Death of Tyra Hunter

54 years after African Americans fought to end police brutality on this street, the LGBTQ community did the same against their public protectors, and ignited a revolution of their own.

Grimke School, 1923 Vermont Avenue, now sits abandoned, in the shadow of the African American Civil War Memorial, and next to the African American Civil War Museum. It’s about to get redeveloped, so won’t look like this for much longer.
Continue reading→

When Church meetings Became Street Protests: Vermont Avenue and the Era of Civil Rights, Washington, DC, USA

When Church meetings Became Street Protests: Vermont Avenue and the Era of Civil Rights, Washington, DC, USA

This very complete historical account of the fight against police brutality from 1936-1941 in Washington, DC Shootings by DC Police Spark Fight Against Brutality 1936-41 | Washington Area Spark tells the story of Vermont Avenue’s presence in the earliest marches for personal freedom, 80 years after Abraham Lincoln traversed this road to reach his refuge in Northwest Washington, DC.

They happened during a time when African American people felt powerless at the hands of the Washington, DC police force.
Continue reading→

The origins of Vermont Avenue, Washington, DC USA

The origins of Vermont Avenue, Washington, DC USA

Vermont is one of Washington, DC’s state-named avenues, one of six state named avenues that emanates from the White House. The State of Vermont joined the union in 1791, while Washington, DC was being laid out, so it received a place in the earliest maps of the city.

Note: Taking a little diversion into Washington, DC (one of the three foci of this blog) and specifically Vermont Avenue over the next week Continue reading→

Photo Friday: Emancipation Day, Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: Emancipation Day, Washington, DC USA

Who would be free themselves must strike the blow. Better even die free than to live slaves – Frederick Douglass March 2, 1863

Continue reading→

Thanks for publishing my photo, in Boston University School of Law Associate Professor of Legal Writing Discusses North Carolina’s New Transgender Law 

Thanks for publishing my photo, in Boston University School of Law Associate Professor of Legal Writing Discusses North Carolina's New Transgender Law 

Nice treatment of the original image (see post).

And this recurring theme caught my eye:

Although these new laws are disturbing to those of us who support equal rights for all Americans, these laws seem to be the last gasp of a failed mission.

Because I have heard it once before.
Continue reading→

Reading the comments and writing some. Thoughts on ending transphobia

Reading the comments and writing some. Thoughts on ending transphobia

“Never read the comments” is what people say about articles online that cover LGBTQ and specifically transgender issues.

What they mean, often correctly, is that the biased and unloving statements they may see will trigger negative feelings and reminders that we live in a world that is still learning to love better.

We shouldn’t have to see those comments, though, because they shouldn’t be allowed in the first place.
Continue reading→

Thanks for publishing my photo, in 12 Most Eye-Catching Public Works of Art in NYC - NewYork.com

Thanks for publishing my photo, in 12 Most Eye-Catching Public Works of Art in NYC – NewYork.com

In tribute, artist George Segal cast four bronze figures — two standing males and two seated females — depicting the love shared between them rather than sexuality. Completed in 1980, it took 12 more years to overcome public opposition and be installed in Christopher Park, opposite the Stonewall Inn. Despite repeated vandalism over the years, the couples remain ever tender.

via @NewYorkcom Continue reading→