Photo Friday: 6 year disruptorversary with Jay Parkinson, MD

Photo Friday: 6 year disruptorversary with Jay Parkinson, MD

Jay Parkinson (@JayParkinson) and I met up this time the same way we did the first time, when I think I texted (or Gchatted?) Jay while I was cruising through Williamsburg, New York, back in 2009 (to which he responded, “come on over”). This time he was the messager and it was great to catch up. Continue reading→

Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Continuing the discussion from this earlier post (see: Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans), this study takes the previous one even farther – looking at the application of evidence based care and survival among people who have colon cancer. A few things I learned while reading this one: Definition of an integrated … Continue reading Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

Yesterday I had the opportunity to reconnect with colleagues in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, and specifically the current class of fellows in the “iconic” Yale Program (@RWJFCSP_Yale) Our interaction took place both in the awesome Logan Circle neighborhood in Washington, DC, as well as a tour of the Kaiser Permanente Center for … Continue reading Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

The ability to know about your community’s health: the 2nd Street Pedestrian Sensor

The ability to know about your community's health: the 2nd Street Pedestrian Sensor

This image isn’t the erratic heartbeat of a person (who wouldn’t be in good condition if it was), it’s the heartbeat of a city, in this case Washington, DC.

Here are more snapshots of the traffic we’ve been monitoring since January – they show that there’s a morning walking commute toward downtown (The Capitol and the Supreme Court) that’s at a more defined time, and then a more spread out commute home in the afternoons. The opposite side of the street has a new sidewalk open but we haven’t seen a dip in traffic yet because of it. Continue reading→

What Design Thinking Looks Like – to help move health care forward

What Design Thinking Looks Like - to help move health care forward

This week is synthesis for KPLantern, the project of the Kaiser Permanente Innovation Consultancy (@KPInnovation) to understand the health and health care of people who are transgender, using a human centered design/fieldwork approach.

This is my first time doing this, and there’s nothing I’ve done like it before. Lots of post-its and care given to the stories and experiences encountered in our field work to date. Continue reading→

Just Read: They’re not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

Just Read: They're not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

The KPLantern team is now engaged in “synthesis,” which currently looks like a secure room with a lot of post-it notes (photo below) and as part of that we are reviewing relevant science. This paper describes a clever study designed to look at how transgender children’s unconscious brains work. When challenged subliminally do they really … Continue reading Just Read: They’re not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

Just Read: Dream City – the incredible story (and social determinants) of Washington, DC

Just Read: Dream City - the incredible story (and social determinants) of Washington, DC

This book is what I would call the climax of three books devoted to the history of (one of) the most important cities in the world, definitely the most important city in my world.

The other two, also reviewed here are Just Read: S Street Rising: Crack, Murder, and Redemption in D.C. and Just Read: Mayor for Life: The Incredible Story of Marion Barry, Jr..

It turns out, as almost everyone acknowledges, Washington, DC is not yet complete. It is in many ways a divided place, with limitations placed on its innovation and survival by our federal government. That’s the history that this book covers. If you live here or have ever lived here, I guarantee your pupils will dilate every other page, the stories are too incredible.

Continue reading→