What I learned at DC Tech Meetup

2017.03.29 DC Tech Meetup, Washington, DC USA 01978
2017.03.29 DC Tech Meetup, Washington, DC USA 01978 (View on Flickr.com)

Since this blog is about what I learned yesterday.

Chris Breene (@GoForTopherB), who I had the good fortune of meeting after the bad fortune of Jess Jacob’s unnecessary death, puts a lot of effort with the @DCTechMeetup team into making this happen.

And this time it happened in the historic Howard Theatre (@HowardTheatre), a great space, in a great neighborhood, in the best city in the world.

  • There are more analytics platforms than ever
  • Everyone is making money off of Twitter, except Twitter the company (why is that?)
  • CRMs come in different shapes and sizes, some better than others – and it’s the side comments made during the demos that inform those understandings ๐Ÿ™‚ .
  • Whether in tech or not people are drawn to the future, and why wouldn’t they be, this is Washington, DC…

Rest of my photos below (all @CreativeCommons licensed of course), great job Chris and team.

Photo Friday: With the Spirits and Ancestors, Washington, DC USA

โ€œIf you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future*. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.โ€ (probably misattributed to Lao Tzu, I got it from Tim Ferriss)

2017.03.04 DC People and Places 00400
Vietnam War Memorial – 2017.03.04 DC People and Places 00400 (View on Flickr.com)
Washington, DC, USA has a natural release valve for the times when people need to be in the present – you don’t have to walk very far to spend time with the spirits and the ancestors.

And then, reliably, you can walk back toward the city to see the future being born. Pretty much every day ๐Ÿ™‚ .

*Regarding the quote above. Anxiety is not always a bad thing; it’s related to its cousin eagerness, driven by the embrace of curiosity. Glass 3/4 full always.

Rest of the series here + a few virtual reality shots. We’ll see if photography embraces this trend or not. In the meantime… living in the future.

Photo Friday: Brookland, Washington, DC USA – An amazing journey through American History

2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA  00693
2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA 00693
“Charles Richard Drew Memorial Bridge
Named in honor of
Dr. Charles Richard Drew, 1904-1950
esteemed citizen
of the
District of Columbia
athlete, scholar, surgeon, and
scientist whose discoveries in
blood preservation saved
thousands of lives.”

(View on Flickr.com)
This week’s photograph is from the historic Brookland Neighborhood, in Washington, DC. I was asked by the team at @Urbanturf_DC to go take a look with my camera (I don’t do commissioned work, this is an exception, as I’ve described previously).

The photograph above is from the Charles R. Drew Memorial Bridge, in Brookland (of course), where he once resided.

Many in the medical field know of Charles Drew as the namesake of some of the most important medical institutions in the United States today. And like many who lived (and live today) in Washington, DC, led in a world that didn’t want them to.

As the most prominent African-American in the field (of blood storage and transfusion), Drew protested against the practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood, as it lacked scientific foundation, and resigned his position with American Red Cross, which maintained the policy until 1950.

Brookland is an amazing journey through American History and the people who saved thousands of lives through medical science, helped create a Jewish State (Israel), changed entertainment, prevented Washington, DC from being turned into a 12-lane freeway, including most of present day Shaw, U Street, and Dupont Circle. They happened to be African American.

This was the plan for the neighborhoods of Washington, DC in 1970. (source)
Rest of the photos from the series are below. All taken via #activetransportation, I can’t believe I get to walk here ๐Ÿ™‚ .

Photos from Washington, DC Feb 4-5, 2017 (Lady Gaga homage at White House)

2017.02.03 WERK in Solidarity- Celebrating Intersectionality & Resistance Washington, DC USA 00355
2017.02.03 WERK in Solidarity- Celebrating Intersectionality & Resistance Washington, DC USA 00355 (View on Flickr.com)

With special Lady Gaga scene in front of the White House:

2017.02.03 WERK in Solidarity- Celebrating Intersectionality & Resistance Washington, DC USA 3667

All photographs are Creative Commons (@CreativeCommons) licensed, feel free to use.

You can access the albums directly here and here.

Photo Friday: No Longer Obsolete, Logan Circle, Washington, DC USA

2016.08.16 DC People and Places 07407-Edit
2016.08.16 DC People and Places 07407-Edit (View on Flickr.com)
See www.instagram.com/artblocdc/ www.instagram.com/p/BHf7ms7j4Qj/?taken-by=artblocdc and www.instagram.com/p/BHmZPYcj1_F/

Murals like this one, from the Logan Circle/Shaw neighborhood can be seen popping up all over Washington, DC while walking, and they’re beautiful (as is everything in our most gorgeous capital city).

I’m learning how to use software to create the image that I see with my eye rather than the one captured by the camera. Here’s the original:

2016.08.16 DC People and Places 07408
2016.08.16 DC People and Places 07408 (View on Flickr.com)

Just down the street is another beautiful and meaningful mural, celebrating the work of Washington, DC photographer Addison Scurlock:

2016.06.12 Addison Scurlock Mural, Shaw Neighboorhood, Washington, dC USA 06
2016.06.12 Addison Scurlock Mural, Shaw Neighboorhood, Washington, dC USA 06 (View on Flickr.com)

Scurlock’s studio was just a few blocks from where I live, and from it he captured some of the most haunting images of Washington, DC as it was destroyed following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. In its present incarnation, the building that housed his studio is now at the center of the modern day LGBTQ community in Washington, DC, fitting because these are the spaces where the future is born.

Here’s a composite of the two eras (1968-2014) that I produced previously (excuse the poor perspective – I’m always learning :))

Nellies Sportsbar formerly Scurlock Studios 49945
Nellies Sportsbar formerly Scurlock Studios 49945 (View on Flickr.com)

As the title of the post says, this neighborhood and the ones surrounding it were deemed “obsolete” by the then The National Capital Park and Planning Commission in 1950, with the recommendation that they be completely be re-faced. (Was your neighborhood “obsolete” in 1950? – Greater Greater Washington). These neighborhoods were supposed to be destroyed by a grand highway (they weren’t). They were supposed to be skipped over for Metro access (they weren’t due to community activism). They were supposed to be neglected by city administrators who lived in places very far away, with different ideas about diversity and inclusion (they were). Other parts of the city were not spared and were decimated in the name of modern, car-centric planning, and continue to deal with that legacy.

So maybe in the end, a declaration of obsolescence was really the most health-sparing intervention that happened in this place that was felt to have no value. Except to people like Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King Jr., and present and past leaders in the LGBTQ community who continue to lead the world in a better human experience for all. (see: Photo Friday: Leading in a world that doesnโ€™t want you to โ€“ Thurgood Marshall Center, Washington, DC USA โ€“ Ted Eytan, MD)

Photo Friday: Leading in a world that doesn’t want you to – Thurgood Marshall Center, Washington, DC USA

For more info about this area, see my series on Vermont Avenue, NW.

My city mirrors my professional experience in health care, which is that innovation happens in the obsolete places, which is why it is always gorgeous in my mind.

More photos of this mural below