Just Read: #WhatADoctorLooksLike – Implicit Bias in Academic Medicine – via JAMA

Just Read: #WhatADoctorLooksLike - Implicit Bias in Academic Medicine - via JAMA

Where I went to medical school (University of Arizona College of Medicine), we had the typical “wall of fame” of all the previous graduating classes prominently mounted, covering the history of the school’s first class from 1967 to the present.

It was amusing to note that as you walked along the wall that the number of women in each class steadily increased, to the year after mine, when for the first time there were more women than men in incoming class.

Except that in retrospect, it wasn’t really funny.

The other thing I noticed was that the Nursing School building, erected a few years after the medical school building next to it, didn’t seem to have very many men’s rooms…

The wall showed another thing, that there were no LGBTQ human beings enrolled in this school. Except that there were. However, all the signs and signals in our curriculum and the behavior of our faculty conspired to keep this just an “allegation.”

And so…we can now measure the impact.

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Why some people don’t get a thank you for using my photos

Do I really mean thanks when I say thanks? An esteemed colleague of mine asked me recently, “When you say ‘thank you’ via social media to someone using your photos, are you truly thanking them?” The answer is an unequivocal yes! My photographs are Creative Commons Licensed, and meant to be used to promote the …

You can look at the comments. My experiment in ending transphobia. What you don’t permit, you don’t promote

You can look at the comments. My experiment in ending transphobia. What you don't permit, you don't promote

In social media spaces, the challenge of any platform that you don’t control (Facebook) is that there are things out of your control. Given that situation, I carefully judge where and when I engage in what I call health activism.

Knowing this, I still didn’t expect it, but…it happened.

Ever so subtly and then more apparently, transphobic comments began appearing on the post.

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Reading the comments and writing some. Thoughts on ending transphobia

Reading the comments and writing some. Thoughts on ending transphobia

“Never read the comments” is what people say about articles online that cover LGBTQ and specifically transgender issues.

What they mean, often correctly, is that the biased and unloving statements they may see will trigger negative feelings and reminders that we live in a world that is still learning to love better.

We shouldn’t have to see those comments, though, because they shouldn’t be allowed in the first place.

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The comments are respectful, too, in Changing Gender on the Job – Harvard Business Review

Crucible: Changing Gender on the Job – Harvard Business Review. Thanks to twitter friend James Spicka (@jcs0716) for pointing this article out to me, it describes the experience of Michael Wallent becoming Megan Wallent at Microsoft Corporation, as published in the Harvard Business Review (@HarvardBiz). It isn’t just the article that impressed me, it’s the …