Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just catching up on my blogging and continuing a closer look at nutrition and health.

This paper discusses a different and emerging approach about diet in people with diabetes, beginning with the declaration that we really don’t know what the optimal diet for people with diabetic is:

The optimal degree of caloric restriction and macronutrient distribution of medical nutritional therapy in T2DM is not well defined.

Traditionally, a low-fat diet has been prescribed, which really is a high-carbohydrate diet that brings with it questions about why feeding carbohydrates to people who are intolerant of them makes sense.

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Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

In some of the work I do, and the work I am doing now, it is a continual source of marvel that some of the most important scholars in a field (you name it) do not have an identity in social media (Do physicians tweet about environmental stewardship in health care?). I give presentations and talks to them about this…and some of them invite me to give them presentations and talks about this (oh, like this one: Dialogue about #hcsm at the 2013 #AAMCJtMtg – Academic Medicine and Social Media).

In this particular space, I think it’s even more critical because from my perspective, even as a physician, it’s not possible to understand the meaning of a published paper without asking questions.

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Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

For some reason, I have always had a keen interest in my personal health – I took nutritional sciences courses in college before I went to medical school, something only a few of us pre-med students did.

To this day, I still remember a curious statement in my Pathology textbook (and while writing this post, I confirmed that it was there, as of the 2005 Edition). It said:

Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis: Lesser, Uncertain, or Nonquantitated: High carbohydrate intake

I thought that was strange since we, and all of America, were/are being told to indulge in a high carbohydrate diet.

This book, by Nina Techolz, develops that theme in exquisite detail.

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Just Read: Listening to Physiology instead of a Wearable for Weight Loss

Just Read: Listening to Physiology instead of a Wearable for Weight Loss

After reading the study about the impact of (a certain type of) wearable devices on weight loss (See: Just Read: Study – Wearables don’t improve weight loss – can you outrun a bad diet? ) – answer, not much – I also read this study at the same time that focused on exercise and diet in a very different way, and had much different outcomes.

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Just Read: Study – Wearables don’t improve weight loss – can you outrun a bad diet?

Just Read: Study - Wearables don't improve weight loss - can you outrun a bad diet?

“When I wore an exercise tracker, it DEmotivated me…” – quote from attendee at recent convening.

This study published in JAMA a few weeks ago (September, 2016), produced the unexpected (and curious) results.

Overweight and obese randomized to receive wearable devices as part of a weight loss program gained back more weight than users who did not receive wearables, after an initial 6 month weight loss.

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