Photo Friday: In Washington, DC, health care does what policy makers can’t…until later

Photo Friday: In Washington, DC, health care does what policy makers can't...until later

The image is of the iconic Whitman Walker Health (@WhitmanWalker) on 14th Street NW in Washington, DC, lit in the colors of the transgender pride flag, immediately following 2017 Capital TransPride, of which Whitman Walker is a presenting sponsor.

Given the location, in one of the busiest corridors in our nation’s capital, the sight is as stunning and meaningful as was the lighting of the White House in the colors of the LGBTQ Pride flag.

It’s not the first time Whitman Walker has led, as you can see from this 2007 photograph that I took:

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Thanks for using my photos: Hundreds Of LGBTQ People Held A Dance Party Protest via The Huffington Post

Thanks for using my photos: Hundreds Of LGBTQ People Held A Dance Party Protest via The Huffington Post

We’re all here for health and Love always wins 🙂 .

I’m mostly putting this here for the record. Werk for Peace @WerkForPeace was born out of the massacre of 49 people who were killed while being human.

At the same time, because this is a blog about what I learned yesterday, I’m reflecting on similar actions in our nation’s capital in 2008 that I was at:

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Photo Friday: Are Patients Human Beings? (Answer is YES) #TDOV Washington, DC USA

Photo Friday: Are Patients Human Beings? (Answer is YES) #TDOV Washington, DC USA

In 1943, this was actually an explicit question – (“Are Patients Human Beings?”). In 2017…. it’s still an explicit one depending on the population, and an implicit one for most practitioners taking care of vulnerable populations. This photograph begs the question of whether this should be a question for anyone in the healing professions.

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Photo Friday: “Just be a Mom” Jeanne White-Ginder on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act

Photo Friday: "Just be a Mom" Jeanne White-Ginder on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act

Through and because of the work of Phil Kucab (@PhillipKucab) I was honored to see and meet Jeanne White-Ginder, who was in Washington, DC on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act.

Nancy Pelosi (@NancyPelosi) and Jim McDermott (@RepJimMcDermott) reminded the audience in their comments that the world was once an unkind place for people it didn’t understand, and, more importantly, the kindness and societal transformation that arose as a result.

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#PSOTU2016 : My Story

#PSOTU2016 : My Story

Community colleagues Claudia Williams (@ClaudiaWilliams), Nick Dawson (@NickDawson) and I hosted a delightful gathering in Arlington, Virgina for People’s State of the Union (#PSOTU2016), “AN ANNUAL CIVIC RITUAL AND PARTICIPATORY ART PROJECT” supported by the US Department of Arts and Culture (@USartsdept).

My story theme was about a time in 2015 that I felt optimistic about health in our country. It has a title that I’ve oft mentioned on this blog:

The World is Learning to Love Better

Since I’m into visuals and social media, my story includes both.

It goes like this.

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Photo Friday: High Heel Race, Washington, DC USA – Proof that the world is learning to love better

Photo Friday: High Heel Race, Washington, DC USA - Proof that the world is learning to love better

This week’s photograph was taken at the annual Dupont Circle High Heel Race, in its 29th year. Mayor of Washington, DC, Muriel Bowser (@MayorBowser) is pictured with the Fanta women. It’s a great night where the diversity of the community is celebrated by all.

One of my colleagues mentioned what a change it is to have police working in partnership to promote safety and a fun event. In fact, Sergeant Jessica Hawkins, the head of the Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit was there with us the entire time. Jessica also happens to be a transgender woman.

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Thanks for publishing my photo, in this lovely book: Gay & Lesbian History for Kids, by Jerome Pohlen

Thanks for publishing my photo, in this lovely book: Gay & Lesbian History for Kids, by Jerome Pohlen

I didn’t know that the author of the poem “America,” Katherine Lee Bates, whose work was later set to music and became “America the Beautiful” was probably a woman who was a lesbian.

Or that the origin of the high five in 1977 was professional baseball player Glenn Burke, who was the first to come out as gay.

Or that Sally Ride, the first woman in space and the youngest American in space, was survived by her partner Tam O’Shaughnessy, who accepted her Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Or that as many as 1,000 people born as females served as men in the civil war, including Albert Cashier, who lived as a man but was forced to wear a dress until he died, with his authentic name on his headstone (“Albert D.J. Cashier”).

I was introduced to this book by its author, Jerome Pohlen, who asked to use a photograph I took on its back cover (the answer to these questions is always yes).

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