Thanks for publishing my photo, @WTOP in DC’s biggest gay nightclub, Town Danceboutique, closing next year

2017.06.08 Pride DC People and Places, Washington DC USA 6127
2017.06.08 Pride DC People and Places, Washington DC USA 6127 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for publishing my photo @WTOP . Venues like this one have an important place in making people feel safer and accepted in their true identities. It explains part of the significance of the murder of 49 people at Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12, 2016.

Town Danceboutique, the largest LGBTQ night club in Washington, will close July 1, 2018 to make way for a new residential development.

Source: DC’s biggest gay nightclub, Town Danceboutique, closing next year | WTOP

Thanks for Publishing my Photo @WalrusMagazine in The Business Case for Sexual Diversity 

2017.06.05 Pride DC People and Places, Washington, DC USA 6054
2017.06.05 Pride DC People and Places, Washington, DC USA 6054 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for using my photo, Canada’s Walrus Magazine (@WalrusMagazine). It’s of a rainbow-flag adorned Washington, DC at this year’s LGBTQ Pride celebration. I have never seen as many rainbow (and transgender pride) flags spread across Washington, East, West, North, South.

By the way, regarding the article, there is a large quantity of data showing that diversity enhances productivity and profitability in the workplace. Not to mention that from a biological perspective, it allows the human species to survive.

The world is learning to love better, and Washington, DC is the capital of that movement 🙂 . More photos from this series below, enjoy.

Being visibly out at your job is not only a question of justice—it also makes for a better workplace

Source: The Business Case for Sexual Diversity · The Walrus

Photo Friday: Rainbow Flags at LGBTQ Pride, Baltimore, MD USA

2016.06.17 Baltimore Pride, Baltimore, MD USA 6735
2016.06.17 Baltimore Pride, Baltimore, MD USA 6735 (View on Flickr.com)

This week’s photo is an easy choice. It’s a rainbow pride flag flying over Charles Street, Baltimore, MD, USA for 2017 Baltimore Pride. Nothing says visibility like a rainbow flag. Plenty of transgender pride flags as well, many many more than this same event 4 years ago.

The world is learning to love better. Rest of the photographs from the event are below. Enjoy.

Finding LGBTQ Material at the @NMAAHC – a helpful twitter dialogue

NMAAHC

One of the many reasons I love social media. The National Museum of African American History and Culture (@NMAAHC) responded to my blog post (Being #TransVisible at the National Museum of African American History and Culture) via Twitter and provided helpful information for my next visit. And there will be one (when I am able to get in 🙂 ).

More learning per square inch in Washington, DC than any other place I have ever been. The dialogue is below, feel free to reference it on your trip.

Thanks @Expedia, for publishing my photos in 15 exciting LGBTQ-friendly cities around the world 

Madrid Pride Orgullo 2015 58419
Madrid Pride Orgullo 2015 58419 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for choosing several of my photos to illustrate this piece on the Expedia (@Expedia) viewfinder blog.

I chose my favorite of the 7 they used above. It’s of “Carrera De Tacones”, High Heel Race, Madrid Pride, Calle Pelayo, from 2015. Madrid, Spain celebrates its 40th year of Pride festivals this year. In 2015 it celebrated 10 years of marriage equality. High heel races are slightly different in Madrid than they are in the United States – oh the cobblestones!

In this century, it’s definitely “As Washington, DC goes, so goes the nation,” but I suppose we look to inspiration from the world 🙂 . And a great one it is, where everyone is respected and represented. The Rest of the photos they chose are below. Enjoy.

Peace, love, and understanding are what make these LGBTQ-friendly cities so fun. Party hop for Pride or visit any time, these places are always welcoming.

Source: 15 exciting LGBTQ-friendly cities around the world | Expedia Viewfinder

Being #TransVisible at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

I ❤️when we support things. #BeKP kpthrive nmaahc #lovealwayswins #EqualityEqualsHealth #TransVisibility #KPpride #activetransportation
I ❤️when we support things. #BeKP @kpthrive @nmaahc #lovealwayswins #EqualityEqualsHealth #TransVisibility #KPpride #activetransportation (View on Flickr.com)

The information desk could not direct us to any displays featuring transgender people. The bathrooms are gendered. When I asked a staff person where the LGBT section was, she said “What does LGBT stand for?”

I know that’s not the intent of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (@NMAAHC) based on the work they’ve done (see the Twitter moment at the bottom of this post), so these things are not a big deal in the overall experience that the NMAAHC is.

I could only be there for a brief time (when you see a chance you take it) and I experienced multiple incredible micro-interactions that I can’t even express here, not just with the imagery, with the staff, the other visitors, that were meaningful and remind me why there’s more learning-per-minute in Washington, DC than any other place I’ve been.

Not to mention that it’s the most inclusive city in the world…

The best moment of the day was the selfie that myself and colleague Bianca Rey (@BiancaRey) took in front of the sweet home cafe, which is generously supported by Kaiser Permanente.

After I snapped the photo I asked what hashtags to use and she said, “include #TransVisbility. I’m including that on every photo now.” Of course I did.

30% of Americans know someone who is Transgender. 37% of the youngest Americans (age 18-29) do (see: Many Americans know someone who is gay, fewer know someone who is transgender | Pew Research Center)

Science clearly demonstrates that bias is reduced by contact of a specific nature:

optimal intergroup contact would be of equal status, involve cooperation to achieve common goals, and should be supported by important societal institutions.Just Read: Methods for reducing unconscious bias, implications for transgender person health and medical care

That’s us. Equal status (both people who power Kaiser Permanente, I actually report to Bianca as a Produer on Capital TransPride, she is Co-chair of our Multicultural Business Group), involving cooperating to achieving common goals (Helping our health system learn to love better), supported by important societal institutions (Kaiser Permanente is the highest performing health system in the United States).

One more photo. This is of Bianca at the first ever transgender youth ball in Washington, DC last month, produced by the also-amazing Ruby Corado (@CasaRubyDC). She’s welcoming the attendees and affirming them as valuable members of the Washington, DC community, along with Ruby.

2017.05.19 Capital TransPride Weekend Washington, DC USA 5087
2017.05.19 Capital TransPride Weekend Washington, DC USA 5087 (View on Flickr.com)

Let a few more Americans discover what it’s like to know someone who makes the world a better place for them. My generation of physicians came to health care to make sure that happens, and we will 🙂 .

Rest of my NMAAHC photos below. Thank you for a great experience.