Just Watched: Low-Carb High Fat Diet in Type 1 Diabetes

Just Watched: Low-Carb High Fat Diet in Type 1 Diabetes

I have been interested in nutrition for a long time and more interested recently (see:Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise) ), as more data is being produced about where our dietary guidelines came from. In the case of diabetes, I have been curious about the ways the medical and other professions counsel patients on diets in ways that may actually increase their risk of diabetes and increase their insulin requirement.

Through the magic of YouTube, Dr. Troy Stapleton explains his own journey as a person with type 1 diabetes and the LCHF diet. He’s going to to have much more credibility than I. Watch:

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Just Read: The Case Against Sugar

Just Read: The Case Against Sugar

One of my earliest memories was the rush to the grocery store by my family to stock up on saccharin sweetened beverages when it was feared they would be pulled off the market, in 1977. The shelves were bare (it was as much an emergency as any I remember in the household)…

This was the headline (behind paywal, if you have library access):

By, Tom Shales. 1977. “Tears & Fears: Threat to Saccharin Spurs New Hoarding! Diet-Rite Dementia, Tab Teetotaling in the Offing?” The Washington Post (1974-Current File), Mar 15, 2..

I looked this piece of history up online after I read Gary Taubes’ The Case Against Sugar, and amazingly, in this piece from March, 1977, they seemed to express some of the wisdom that’s now being discussed 40 years later (almost to the day):

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Just Read: Triglycerides and Cardiovascular Disease – American Heart Association Scientific Statement

Just Read: Triglycerides and Cardiovascular Disease -  American Heart Association Scientific Statement

Yes, all 40+ pages of the American Heart Association’s scientific statement, published in 2011 (the most recent one – citation below), for leisure.

Why?

Triglycerides are that lipid component in our blood that we (or let’s say I) are trained not to pay that much attention to, especially relative to cholesterol (LDL, HDL, etc), and yet its story unlocks a lot of mysteries around nutrition and health (again, for me).

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Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just catching up on my blogging and continuing a closer look at nutrition and health.

This paper discusses a different and emerging approach about diet in people with diabetes, beginning with the declaration that we really don’t know what the optimal diet for people with diabetic is:

The optimal degree of caloric restriction and macronutrient distribution of medical nutritional therapy in T2DM is not well defined.

Traditionally, a low-fat diet has been prescribed, which really is a high-carbohydrate diet that brings with it questions about why feeding carbohydrates to people who are intolerant of them makes sense.

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Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

In some of the work I do, and the work I am doing now, it is a continual source of marvel that some of the most important scholars in a field (you name it) do not have an identity in social media (Do physicians tweet about environmental stewardship in health care?). I give presentations and talks to them about this…and some of them invite me to give them presentations and talks about this (oh, like this one: Dialogue about #hcsm at the 2013 #AAMCJtMtg – Academic Medicine and Social Media).

In this particular space, I think it’s even more critical because from my perspective, even as a physician, it’s not possible to understand the meaning of a published paper without asking questions.

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Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

For some reason, I have always had a keen interest in my personal health – I took nutritional sciences courses in college before I went to medical school, something only a few of us pre-med students did.

To this day, I still remember a curious statement in my Pathology textbook (and while writing this post, I confirmed that it was there, as of the 2005 Edition). It said:

Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis: Lesser, Uncertain, or Nonquantitated: High carbohydrate intake

I thought that was strange since we, and all of America, were/are being told to indulge in a high carbohydrate diet.

This book, by Nina Techolz, develops that theme in exquisite detail.

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