About

Welcome.

I am a physician, a family medicine specialist with a focus on total health, diversity, and Washington, DC.

In 2007, I decided to relocate to our nation’s capital, from Seattle, Washington, to further my interests while continuing to live in the future. I believe in open leadership, sharing, and freedom from conflict of interest.

More detail, including my official bio, is on the Portfolio page.

It’s glass 3/4 full. Always and in all ways.

Comments always welcome. Feel free to connect via social media, links below.

featured photo: Love Wins, Washington, DC, USA, June, 2016, by Ted Eytan, MD

Creative Commons License

Posts

Just Read: Environmental Impacts of the U.S. Health Care System – (Carbon as a currency for health)?

Just Read: Environmental Impacts of the U.S. Health Care System - (Carbon as a currency for health)?

This review could be considered an update to the brief analysis that appeared in 2009 describing US Health Care’s contribution to green house gas (GHG) emissions to be 8% of the country’s total. And now it’s up to 9.8% (or maybe 9.3% since the models used to calculate the number are based on 2002 standards …

Just Read: Triglycerides and Cardiovascular Disease – American Heart Association Scientific Statement

Just Read: Triglycerides and Cardiovascular Disease -  American Heart Association Scientific Statement

Yes, all 40+ pages of the American Heart Association’s scientific statement, published in 2011 (the most recent one – citation below), for leisure.

Why?

Triglycerides are that lipid component in our blood that we (or let’s say I) are trained not to pay that much attention to, especially relative to cholesterol (LDL, HDL, etc), and yet its story unlocks a lot of mysteries around nutrition and health (again, for me).
Continue reading→

March 2017: What Am I Doing Now? #ADayWithoutTed and mini-retirement

March 2017: What Am I Doing Now? #ADayWithoutTed and mini-retirement

I’ve decided to start the ‘now’ page movement. For more information: about nownownow.com. These posts will mirror updates to the /now page on this blog. Comments welcome.

Greetings from Washington, DC (of course) and welcome to my first now update.

I am currently in the middle of a mini-retirement (I’m calling it #ADayWithoutTed).

Just 5 days. Because life is amazing, and because I can. Continue reading→

What am I doing now?

What is this? It’s my now page, based on a movement created by Derek Sivers

photo: #ProtectTransWomen Day of Action, Washington, DC USA, March, 2017, by Ted Eytan, MD

2017.03.21 Tagg Magazine 2017 Enterprising Women, Washington, DC USA 3904
2017.03.21 Tagg Magazine 2017 Enterprising Women, Washington, DC USA 3904 (View on Flickr.com)

Greetings from Washington, DC (of course) and welcome to my first now update.

I am currently in the middle of a mini-retirement (I’m calling it #ADayWithoutTed).

Just 5 days – emphasis on “mini.”

Because life is amazing, and because I can.

I’m using the time to…

  • Brush up a little on my photography (always doing some of that)
  • Tidy up this blog and begin coding for a new theme (it’s time)
  • Set up email newsletters to my liking (I’m using Feedburner, which has limitations, any suggestions let me know)
  • Creating this now page (based on a movement created by Derek Sivers)

I’ll be continuing with the activities above after mini-retirement, albeit in a more time-managed sort of way.

Other things I’m doing

I recently enjoyed meeting 2017’s Enterprising Women, from which the photograph on the right is taken. One thing that’s a constant is my enjoyment of the future and Washington, DC, where both seem to happen in tandem 🙂 .

That’s it for now (and this first now page). Seems like a lot. Good to take stock. I therefore like the concept.

Is there anything I should be doing that I’m not? Let me know in the comments connected to the post about this status update.

Updated 2017.03.27 – Based on a movement created by Derek Sivers


What’s a mini-retirement?

Timothy Ferriss argues that instead of deferring retirement to the end of our careers, we would be happier, more fulfilled, and more productive if we instead took “mini-retirements” throughout our lives.”

Because I realize I haven’t posted the story of the Mexican Fisherman elsewhere on this blog, I’m doing it here. It will help explain the concept. The story, by the way is based on on this one: Anekdote zur Senkung der Arbeitsmoral – Wikipedia

An American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.

The Mexican replied, “only a little while. The American then asked why didn’t he stay out longer and catch more fish? The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs. The American then asked, “but what do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siestas with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine, and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life.” The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat, you could buy several boats, eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually New York City, where you will run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied, “15 – 20 years.”

“But what then?” Asked the Mexican.

The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions!”

“Millions – then what?”

The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siestas with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.”