Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 – Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 - Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

It gets better.

This is a 2015 update from Author Daniel Effron at London Business School (@lbs) – and yet another reminder that the business profession has done as much if not more work in the area of behavioral health as the medical profession.

Continuing from the previous post on this topic (Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care), this update adds more information about human motivation.

I’m framing this post through the perspective of bias, but the principles apply to health behavior, consumer behavior, etc….

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Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing - a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Earlier in my career, I remember a colleague saying to me, in a challenge to observed, biased behavior, “this is organization x, those things don’t happen here.” He said it with a dismissive chuckle. And yet, it did happen…

I have been intensely interested in the concept of “Illusion of Objectivity” especially in health care, and so have done a deep literature review, which brought me to this paper and the concept of moral self-license…

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Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

In some of the work I do, and the work I am doing now, it is a continual source of marvel that some of the most important scholars in a field (you name it) do not have an identity in social media (Do physicians tweet about environmental stewardship in health care?). I give presentations and talks to them about this…and some of them invite me to give them presentations and talks about this (oh, like this one: Dialogue about #hcsm at the 2013 #AAMCJtMtg – Academic Medicine and Social Media).

In this particular space, I think it’s even more critical because from my perspective, even as a physician, it’s not possible to understand the meaning of a published paper without asking questions.

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Just Published In: POTUS Tweets Book

Just Published In: POTUS Tweets Book

I was recently contacted by Jennifer Linney, the publisher of the book POTUS Tweets, about using my photographs to illustrate the moments of history catalogued in the book.

President Barack Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to tweet from the @POTUS Twitter handle, and he did so from May 18, 2015 to January 20, 2017. That Twitter handle will pass from president to president as terms end and terms begin, and the National Archives and Records Administration has preserved President Obama’s tweets in electronic format only, under a new Twitter handle: @POTUS44

Old-fashioned paper-and-ink girl that I am, I’ve compiled a book of those tweets.

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Just Read: What Doctors Feel, How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

Just Read: What Doctors Feel, How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

I’ve noticed in my personal and professional journey that it’s challenging for people to understand doctors. This book helps. I was referred to it by an influential physician leader in my life (Walking and Talking about Physician Wellness with Dawn Clark, MD, Physician Chief Wellness Facilitator), as the medical profession works to understand how to make itself to be more resilient in service to humanity.

I don’t think understanding physicians should be a prerequisite for receiving compassionate care. However/and, in working to lead with physicians or create the physicians of tomorrow, a little understanding goes a long way.

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Just Read: Current Science on Consumer Use of Mobile Health for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Just Read: Current Science on Consumer Use of Mobile Health for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Catching up on my reading…as this American Heart Association (@American_Heart) Scientific Statement was published in 2015, however it’s very exhaustive. And even more skeptical than I am about these things.

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Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

For some reason, I have always had a keen interest in my personal health – I took nutritional sciences courses in college before I went to medical school, something only a few of us pre-med students did.

To this day, I still remember a curious statement in my Pathology textbook (and while writing this post, I confirmed that it was there, as of the 2005 Edition). It said:

Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis: Lesser, Uncertain, or Nonquantitated: High carbohydrate intake

I thought that was strange since we, and all of America, were/are being told to indulge in a high carbohydrate diet.

This book, by Nina Techolz, develops that theme in exquisite detail. Continue reading→