Just Read: A Transgender Military Internist’s Perspective – #WhatADoctorLooksLike

Just Read: A Transgender Military Internist's Perspective - #WhatADoctorLooksLike

This article, published in JAMA Internal Medicine describes the personal journey of a physician who is now serving as their authentic self:

…today I serve as a female physician in every respect within the Department of Defense. Last month, I graduated the Army Medical Department’s Advanced Course with honors, and now I look forward to the sec- ond half of my military career being treated like any other capable military physician.

The commentary, by Jamie Henry, MD (@MAJ_JLee_MD), concerns another paper in the journal

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Just Read: #WhatADoctorLooksLike – Implicit Bias in Academic Medicine – via JAMA

Just Read: #WhatADoctorLooksLike - Implicit Bias in Academic Medicine - via JAMA

Where I went to medical school (University of Arizona College of Medicine), we had the typical “wall of fame” of all the previous graduating classes prominently mounted, covering the history of the school’s first class from 1967 to the present.

It was amusing to note that as you walked along the wall that the number of women in each class steadily increased, to the year after mine, when for the first time there were more women than men in incoming class.

Except that in retrospect, it wasn’t really funny.

The other thing I noticed was that the Nursing School building, erected a few years after the medical school building next to it, didn’t seem to have very many men’s rooms…

The wall showed another thing, that there were no LGBTQ human beings enrolled in this school. Except that there were. However, all the signs and signals in our curriculum and the behavior of our faculty conspired to keep this just an “allegation.”

And so…we can now measure the impact.

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Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just Read: What should people with diabetics eat? Study of a low-calorie ketogenic diet

Just catching up on my blogging and continuing a closer look at nutrition and health.

This paper discusses a different and emerging approach about diet in people with diabetes, beginning with the declaration that we really don’t know what the optimal diet for people with diabetic is:

The optimal degree of caloric restriction and macronutrient distribution of medical nutritional therapy in T2DM is not well defined.

Traditionally, a low-fat diet has been prescribed, which really is a high-carbohydrate diet that brings with it questions about why feeding carbohydrates to people who are intolerant of them makes sense.
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Just Read: Marriage equality = 134,000 less suicide attempts in adolescents

Just Read: Marriage equality = 134,000 less suicide attempts in adolescents

We estimated that, each year, same-sex marriage policies would be associated with more than 134 000 fewer adolescents attempting suicide. These results reflect an important reduction in adolescent emotional distress and risk of mortality from suicide.

Equality does equal health. Continue reading→

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 – Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing Part 2 - Challenge to Eliminating Bias in Health Care

It gets better.

This is a 2015 update from Author Daniel Effron at London Business School (@lbs) – and yet another reminder that the business profession has done as much if not more work in the area of behavioral health as the medical profession.

Continuing from the previous post on this topic (Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care), this update adds more information about human motivation.

I’m framing this post through the perspective of bias, but the principles apply to health behavior, consumer behavior, etc….

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Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing – a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Just Read: Moral Self-Licensing - a continual challenge to eliminating bias in health care

Earlier in my career, I remember a colleague saying to me, in a challenge to observed, biased behavior, “this is organization x, those things don’t happen here.” He said it with a dismissive chuckle. And yet, it did happen…

I have been intensely interested in the concept of “Illusion of Objectivity” especially in health care, and so have done a deep literature review, which brought me to this paper and the concept of moral self-license…

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Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

Just Read: Does Hyperinsulinemia cause obesity, and academic discourse on Twitter (finally)

In some of the work I do, and the work I am doing now, it is a continual source of marvel that some of the most important scholars in a field (you name it) do not have an identity in social media (Do physicians tweet about environmental stewardship in health care?). I give presentations and talks to them about this…and some of them invite me to give them presentations and talks about this (oh, like this one: Dialogue about #hcsm at the 2013 #AAMCJtMtg – Academic Medicine and Social Media).

In this particular space, I think it’s even more critical because from my perspective, even as a physician, it’s not possible to understand the meaning of a published paper without asking questions.

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