Thanks for publishing my photo, in Making room for Millennial families – D.C. Policy Center

2016.08.24 DC People and Places 07568
2016.08.24 DC People and Places 07568 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for using my photograph, @DCPolicyCenter, in this excellent analysis of Washington, DC’s growth into a “normal” city. It’s also happily a not-normal city in that it’s the place where the future is born every day 🙂 .

The photograph is of one of the types of structures alluded to in the analysis:

Most new construction is not so helpful, either. In the last few years, a record number of apartment buildings have been permitted, mostly going up in downtown zones where there are looser land-use regulations.[8] But these new units are expensive and small—perfect for singles, couples or roommates. The latest innovations in urban residential new construction has actually been to squeeze into less and less space—dorm-style living with shared kitchens, smaller units that cleverly feel larger or furniture that collapses.[9] Of the more than 60,000 “institutional quality” (i.e., fancy) apartments built since 2000, only about two percent have three or more bedrooms.[10] In addition, D.C.’s existing family-sized apartment stock is not equally dispersed across the city, and much of it is dedicated for low-income public housing.

As usual, I enjoy learning as much from the photographs I take as much as I enjoy taking them.

Making room for Millennial families – D.C. Policy Center

Source: Making room for Millennial families – D.C. Policy Center

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