Thanks for using my photos, in For poor DC residents, safety from sexual violence means access – Greater Greater Washington

2017.02.24 Dance Protest Celebrating Trans Youth, Washington, DC USA 01197
2017.02.24 Dance Protest Celebrating Trans Youth, Washington, DC USA 01197 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for using my photos, @ggwash and @TheJessicaRaven, and for the important piece on disparities in safety.

2017.03.15 ProtectTransWomen Day of Action, Washington, DC USA 01446
2017.03.15 #ProtectTransWomen Day of Action, Washington, DC USA 01446 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks also to Washington, DC for leading the nation in the conversation and gathering first-of-its-kind data:

A 2017 DC Human Rights study showed that 48 percent of DC employers preferred a less qualified cisgender applicant over a more qualified transgender applicant. The study found that employment discrimination rates were highest in DC’s restaurant industry — and in every industry — the unemployment rate is higher among trans people of color.

I wrote about this study previously:

Just Read: Beyond stories, first ever resume testing study of employment discrimination against transgender people

Not everything has been done that can be, as Ruby Corado (@casarubydc) famously said:

"Until everyone has what they need, we can't say we are one city." casarubydc health equality dc
“Until everyone has what they need, we can’t say we are one city.” @casarubydc #health #equality #dc (View on Flickr.com)

As local businesses and agencies work to respond to sexual harassment and make public spaces safer, they must also ask themselves: safer for who?

Source: For poor DC residents, safety from sexual violence means access – Greater Greater Washington

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