Thanks for Using My Photo, in Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C. – D.C. Policy Center

DC People and places with Sony A7 II 50713
DC People and places with Sony A7 II 50713 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks for using my photograph to adorn this very important analysis by Randy Smith (@howardrunbake) at the @DCPolicyCenter, who used open data to visualize a picture of being car-free in DC (which I am, happily for a long time now).

The photograph, by the way, is of Hanover Place, which itself has a long important history around the disenfranchisement and lost hope of a city, when it was the center of drug activity in the 1980’s, just a few miles from the U.S. Capitol. If you click through to the photo on flickr you’ll learn more about that story.

For people interested in healthy transportation, the analysis is key because it shows that the ability to be car free and the desire to be car free are two different things. And, the ability to be car free is concentrated among those with greater means, ironically.

There’s an additional analysis that sheds light on this issue on the DC Policy Center website, that I also recommend reviewing: The demographics of walking and biking to work tell yet another story of gentrification – D.C. Policy Center

If we truly want to make D.C. a more walkable, bikeable, transit-friendly city, we should start with our broader housing and transportation policies. We should expand D.C.’s stock of affordable housing and promote dense, mixed-income developments along transit-accessible corridors; improve both Metro and bus networks so that they are an accessible and reliable option for all residents.

One more reason Washington, DC, is the learning lab for the nation.

Enjoy.

Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C. – D.C. Policy CenterSource: Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C. – D.C. Policy Center

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