Just Read: Study – Wearables don’t improve weight loss – can you outrun a bad diet?

Just Read: Study - Wearables don't improve weight loss - can you outrun a bad diet?

“When I wore an exercise tracker, it DEmotivated me…” – quote from attendee at recent convening.

This study published in JAMA a few weeks ago (September, 2016), produced the unexpected (and curious) results.

Overweight and obese randomized to receive wearable devices as part of a weight loss program gained back more weight than users who did not receive wearables, after an initial 6 month weight loss.

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New Maps of DC health data – Not yet one culture of health

New Maps of DC health data - Not yet one culture of health

Catching up on social innovation I haven’t yet posted about… I have complained previously about the fact that data purporting to show Washington, DC’s health status as a county is usually wrong (see: Do national numbers inaccurately represent Washington, DC’s obesity condition? | Ted Eytan, MD – Answer: YES) because DC has 8 wards within … Continue reading New Maps of DC health data – Not yet one culture of health

Now Reading: The Obesity Paradox – should lack of physical fitness be considered a medical emergency?

Now Reading: The Obesity Paradox - should lack of physical fitness be considered a medical emergency?

My answer to the above is yes. I have told people at the Center for Total Health (@kptotalhealth) that I consider a patient who presents to their doctor without any physical activity a medical emergency. I get looks of surprise when I say this, sometimes a slight chuckle. Source: Lee D, Sui X, Artero EG, … Continue reading Now Reading: The Obesity Paradox – should lack of physical fitness be considered a medical emergency?

Now Reading: Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment

Now Reading: Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes - A Randomized Social Experiment

Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes — A Randomized Social Experiment – As compared with the control group, the group with a randomly assigned opportunity to use a voucher to move to a neighborhood with a lower poverty rate had lower prevalences of a BMI of 35 or more, a BMI of 40 or more, and a … Continue reading Now Reading: Neighborhoods, Obesity, and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment

Now Reading: Does mobile technology support behavior change? Does it support weight loss?

Now Reading: Does mobile technology support behavior change? Does it support weight loss?

The quick answer is: don’t focus on the technology. This is not one, not two, but three papers published in the last six months, the last one last week, encompassing an impressive body of work around behavior change and weight loss, from the same research group led by Bonnie Spring, PhD, at Northwestern University. There’s … Continue reading Now Reading: Does mobile technology support behavior change? Does it support weight loss?

Meet the Member: Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institute Annual Meeting, Behavior Change track

Meet the Member: Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institute Annual Meeting, Behavior Change track

View ‘KPCMI 16582’ on Flickr.com The photograph on the left is from the graphical recording of an immersive experience around the Kaiser Permanente member perspective around the issue of behavior change. The experience was created by Kaiser Permanente’s Innovation Consultancy (@kpinnovation), led by Christi Zuber (@czuber) (of course!) in partnership with the Care Management Institute, … Continue reading Meet the Member: Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institute Annual Meeting, Behavior Change track

Now Reading: Walking Among Adults – United States, 2005 and 2010

Now Reading: Walking Among Adults - United States, 2005 and 2010

Vital Signs: Walking Among Adults — United States, 2005 and 2010. MMWR. 2012;61 Just in time for this week’s walk with a doc in Washington, DC (see: Walk With a Doc – Washington, DC , August 10, 2012 | Ted Eytan, MD), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (@CDC , @CDCObesity) released this report … Continue reading Now Reading: Walking Among Adults – United States, 2005 and 2010