Thanks for publishing my photo, TechCrunch

Thanks for publishing my photo, TechCrunch

Almost 29,000 views (of this photo) and counting…. I guess human beings are drawn to equality 🙂 .

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A Few Photos in the Middle of History Being Made: National Center for Transgender Equality Gala

A Few Photos in the Middle of History Being Made: National Center for Transgender Equality Gala

Last year at this time, there was no Section 1557 rule (see: A Historic LGBTQ Health Symposium on a Historic Day ) or Title IX guidance, with the former on its way to being the biggest change in health care that I can remember in my career. Lyndon Baines Johnson and Richard Nixon would be proud of their legacy. Continue reading→

Photo Friday: "Just be a Mom" Jeanne White-Ginder on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act

Photo Friday: “Just be a Mom” Jeanne White-Ginder on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act

Through and because of the work of Phil Kucab (@PhillipKucab) I was honored to see and meet Jeanne White-Ginder, who was in Washington, DC on the 25th Anniversary of the Ryan White Care Act.

Nancy Pelosi (@NancyPelosi) and Jim McDermott (@RepJimMcDermott) reminded the audience in their comments that the world was once an unkind place for people it didn’t understand, and, more importantly, the kindness and societal transformation that arose as a result. Continue reading→

#PSOTU2016 : My Story

#PSOTU2016 : My Story

Community colleagues Claudia Williams (@ClaudiaWilliams), Nick Dawson (@NickDawson) and I hosted a delightful gathering in Arlington, Virgina for People’s State of the Union (#PSOTU2016), “AN ANNUAL CIVIC RITUAL AND PARTICIPATORY ART PROJECT” supported by the US Department of Arts and Culture (@USartsdept).

My story theme was about a time in 2015 that I felt optimistic about health in our country. It has a title that I’ve oft mentioned on this blog:

The World is Learning to Love Better

Since I’m into visuals and social media, my story includes both.

It goes like this.
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Presentation: How to sustain a (health) revolution

Presentation: How to sustain a (health) revolution

I gave this presentation, what I call my 2nd TED talk (although not affiliated with an actual TED event, just a person named TED – me), exactly 3 years to the day after I gave my first one, at Henry Ford Health System, in 2012 (see: “Embrace of Failure” – TEDx talk with Regina Holliday ), with awesome leader Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday). Continue reading→

Photo Friday: High Heel Race, Washington, DC USA - Proof that the world is learning to love better

Photo Friday: High Heel Race, Washington, DC USA – Proof that the world is learning to love better

This week’s photograph was taken at the annual Dupont Circle High Heel Race, in its 29th year. Mayor of Washington, DC, Muriel Bowser (@MayorBowser) is pictured with the Fanta women. It’s a great night where the diversity of the community is celebrated by all.

One of my colleagues mentioned what a change it is to have police working in partnership to promote safety and a fun event. In fact, Sergeant Jessica Hawkins, the head of the Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit was there with us the entire time. Jessica also happens to be a transgender woman. Continue reading→

Thanks for publishing my photo, in this lovely book: Gay & Lesbian History for Kids, by Jerome Pohlen

Thanks for publishing my photo, in this lovely book: Gay & Lesbian History for Kids, by Jerome Pohlen

I didn’t know that the author of the poem “America,” Katherine Lee Bates, whose work was later set to music and became “America the Beautiful” was probably a woman who was a lesbian.

Or that the origin of the high five in 1977 was professional baseball player Glenn Burke, who was the first to come out as gay.

Or that Sally Ride, the first woman in space and the youngest American in space, was survived by her partner Tam O’Shaughnessy, who accepted her Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Or that as many as 1,000 people born as females served as men in the civil war, including Albert Cashier, who lived as a man but was forced to wear a dress until he died, with his authentic name on his headstone (“Albert D.J. Cashier”).

I was introduced to this book by its author, Jerome Pohlen, who asked to use a photograph I took on its back cover (the answer to these questions is always yes). Continue reading→