What I learned at DC Tech Meetup

2017.03.29 DC Tech Meetup, Washington, DC USA 01978
2017.03.29 DC Tech Meetup, Washington, DC USA 01978 (View on Flickr.com)

Since this blog is about what I learned yesterday.

Chris Breene (@GoForTopherB), who I had the good fortune of meeting after the bad fortune of Jess Jacob’s unnecessary death, puts a lot of effort with the @DCTechMeetup team into making this happen.

And this time it happened in the historic Howard Theatre (@HowardTheatre), a great space, in a great neighborhood, in the best city in the world.

  • There are more analytics platforms than ever
  • Everyone is making money off of Twitter, except Twitter the company (why is that?)
  • CRMs come in different shapes and sizes, some better than others – and it’s the side comments made during the demos that inform those understandings 🙂 .
  • Whether in tech or not people are drawn to the future, and why wouldn’t they be, this is Washington, DC…

Rest of my photos below (all @CreativeCommons licensed of course), great job Chris and team.

Photo Friday: 6th and I Synagogue, Washington, DC USA

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2017.03.18 DC People and Places 01412 (View on Flickr.com)

At sunset, The Sixth and I (@SixthandI) Synagogue featuring the iconic cornerstone laid in 1906:

The congregation holds a cornerstone laying ceremony on November 22, 1906, in the presence of government officials, Christian clergy from nearby churches, Adas Israel officials and members of its building committee. They place a time capsule inside of the cornerstone, containing copies of Jewish newspapers, coins minted in 1906, congregation membership lists, copies of the United States and Adas Israel constitutions, a copy of the April 15, 1865 edition of the New York Herald, giving an account of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the fall of Richmond, and other articles. (via History – Sixth & I)

A few more photos in this series are here (testing a new camera lens in the most beautiful capital city).

2017 Enterprising Women, Washington, DC USA

2017.03.21 Tagg Magazine 2017 Enterprising Women, Washington, DC USA 3904
With 2017 Enterprising woman Bianca Rey – 2017.03.21 Tagg Magazine 2017 Enterprising Women, Washington, DC USA 3904 (View on Flickr.com)

Tagg Magazine’s (@TaggMagazine) 2017 Enterprising Women, including Bianca Rey (@BiancaRey), Executive Producer of Capital TransPride.

This will be my 5th Capital TransPride (@TransprideDC), run by a fantastic team, in an even more awesome venue in 2017, Washington, DC’s legendary Studio Theatre (@Studio_Theatre)

Equality is the future. And the future tends to be born here. Washington, DC USA

Additional photos below.

Tagg Magazine's (@TaggMagazine) <a href="https://taggmagazine.com/features/2017-enterprising-women/">2017 Enterprising Women</a>, including Bianca Rey (@BiancaRey), Executive Producer of Capital TransPride. #theta360 – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Photo Friday: Isn’t Washington, DC Beautiful?

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2017.03.03 DC People and Places 00254 (View on Flickr.com)

When borrowing a good lens, it’s easy to find great material in the nation’s capital, where the future continues to be born. Enjoy.

DC People and Places (series)

Thanks for publishing my photos UrbanTurfDC, in Brookland: Where Change and Charm Collide

2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA 00629-2
2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA 00629-2 (View on Flickr.com)

Thanks, Urban Turf (@urbanturf_dc) for featuring my photos in this piece on their blog:

With growing development prospects and a blend of artistic flair, Catholic history, academic life, and strong community bonds, Brookland moves forward.

Source: Brookland: Where Change and Charm Collide

For over fifty years, the tower-and-dome façade of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the largest Roman Catholic church in North America, has been the defining icon of DC’s Brookland neighborhood.

While that remains the case, a new symbol is stealing the show: giant white letters painted on the eastern face of the Brookland Works building, stretching almost two floors high, that spell out the neighborhood’s name for all to see.

Bold and larger-than-life, the BROOKLAND sign is representative of the many changes this neighborhood has undergone in recent years, fed by growing development prospects and a blend of artistic flair, Catholic history, academic life, and strong community bonds.

Theirs published the same day I published my version of my trip, which you can read about below.

2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA  00650
2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA 00650 (View on Flickr.com)

As I’ve mentioned previously, I don’t do commissioned work, or any type of photography for payment. I’ve made an exception in this case because

  • I love Washington, DC
  • Payment is being directed to a vital community organization supporting LGBTQ and all humans in the Capital, Casa Ruby (@CasaRubyDC)

Although it’s not technically in Brookland, the Mother Teresa Missionaries of Charity exists in close proximity, and to this day I remember Ruby telling us the story of her volunteer work at the Missionary during the AIDS crisis in Washington, DC – a time when the Missionary was protested because neighborhood residents believed HIV could be spread through the air.

If anything, my walk by the houses of the people who led in a world that didn’t want to reaffirms that our generation is changing everything, as generations before us did. It’s how a clock works, it only goes forward 🙂

If you want to pinpoint the landmarks on a map, here you go.

See Post: Photo Friday: Brookland, Washington, DC USA – An amazing journey through American History

Photo Friday: Brookland, Washington, DC USA – An amazing journey through American History

2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA  00693
2017.02.12 Brookland, Washington, DC USA 00693
“Charles Richard Drew Memorial Bridge
Named in honor of
Dr. Charles Richard Drew, 1904-1950
esteemed citizen
of the
District of Columbia
athlete, scholar, surgeon, and
scientist whose discoveries in
blood preservation saved
thousands of lives.”

(View on Flickr.com)
This week’s photograph is from the historic Brookland Neighborhood, in Washington, DC. I was asked by the team at @Urbanturf_DC to go take a look with my camera (I don’t do commissioned work, this is an exception, as I’ve described previously).

The photograph above is from the Charles R. Drew Memorial Bridge, in Brookland (of course), where he once resided.

Many in the medical field know of Charles Drew as the namesake of some of the most important medical institutions in the United States today. And like many who lived (and live today) in Washington, DC, led in a world that didn’t want them to.

As the most prominent African-American in the field (of blood storage and transfusion), Drew protested against the practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood, as it lacked scientific foundation, and resigned his position with American Red Cross, which maintained the policy until 1950.

Brookland is an amazing journey through American History and the people who saved thousands of lives through medical science, helped create a Jewish State (Israel), changed entertainment, prevented Washington, DC from being turned into a 12-lane freeway, including most of present day Shaw, U Street, and Dupont Circle. They happened to be African American.

This was the plan for the neighborhoods of Washington, DC in 1970. (source)
Rest of the photos from the series are below. All taken via #activetransportation, I can’t believe I get to walk here 🙂 .