Just Read: Eliminating physician biases against gay and lesbian people, don’t forget the “T”

Just Read: Eliminating physician biases against gay and lesbian people, don't forget the "T"

This is a study from Yale University about medical students’ explicit and implicit attitudes toward people who are gay and lesbian. Not surprisingly, medical students reflect the biases of the society around them: I created the chart above from the study data which shows that a little less than half of medical students today harbor … Continue reading Just Read: Eliminating physician biases against gay and lesbian people, don’t forget the “T”

Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Continuing the discussion from this earlier post (see: Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans), this study takes the previous one even farther – looking at the application of evidence based care and survival among people who have colon cancer. A few things I learned while reading this one: Definition of an integrated … Continue reading Just Read: Eliminating Disparities in Cancer Care and Survival, too

Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

Yesterday I had the opportunity to reconnect with colleagues in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, and specifically the current class of fellows in the “iconic” Yale Program (@RWJFCSP_Yale) Our interaction took place both in the awesome Logan Circle neighborhood in Washington, DC, as well as a tour of the Kaiser Permanente Center for … Continue reading Just Read: Eliminating Racial Disparities in Medicare Advantage Plans

Just Read: They’re not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

Just Read: They're not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

The KPLantern team is now engaged in “synthesis,” which currently looks like a secure room with a lot of post-it notes (photo below) and as part of that we are reviewing relevant science. This paper describes a clever study designed to look at how transgender children’s unconscious brains work. When challenged subliminally do they really … Continue reading Just Read: They’re not pretending: Gender Cognition in Transgender Children

Just Read: Dream City – the incredible story (and social determinants) of Washington, DC

Just Read: Dream City - the incredible story (and social determinants) of Washington, DC

This book is what I would call the climax of three books devoted to the history of (one of) the most important cities in the world, definitely the most important city in my world.

The other two, also reviewed here are Just Read: S Street Rising: Crack, Murder, and Redemption in D.C. and Just Read: Mayor for Life: The Incredible Story of Marion Barry, Jr..

It turns out, as almost everyone acknowledges, Washington, DC is not yet complete. It is in many ways a divided place, with limitations placed on its innovation and survival by our federal government. That’s the history that this book covers. If you live here or have ever lived here, I guarantee your pupils will dilate every other page, the stories are too incredible.

Continue reading→

Just Read: Blindspot: Hidden Biases that shape, and could fix, society

Just Read: Blindspot: Hidden Biases that shape, and could fix, society

The topic of implicit or unconscious bias is integrated into a lot of the work I am doing today. I did a pretty exhaustive review of the research last year in preparation for this presentation (Presentation: Being a Transgender Ally and Unconscious Bias ). I am about to give a refreshed version of the presentation to fellow clinicians at Kaiser Permanente (which I’ll post here).

I figured it would be a good idea to read the book version of all the papers I read and the experts I spoke to last year (much of it chronicled here, many many posts…). This is that book. Continue reading→

Just Read: From Patients to Providers: Changing the Culture in Medicine Toward Sexual and Gender Minorities

Just Read: From Patients to Providers: Changing the Culture in Medicine Toward Sexual and Gender Minorities

This is a perspective piece accompanying the study that I wrote about yesterday.

In some areas, like academic medicine, the medical profession continues to change at a pace slower than the world around it:

we posit that SGM* trainees and health professionals face discrimination in medicine and that these environments are ultimately connected to the inequities that our patients encounter when accessing care.

Continue reading→