Just Read: What Doctors Feel, How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

Just Read: What Doctors Feel, How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

I’ve noticed in my personal and professional journey that it’s challenging for people to understand doctors. This book helps. I was referred to it by an influential physician leader in my life (Walking and Talking about Physician Wellness with Dawn Clark, MD, Physician Chief Wellness Facilitator), as the medical profession works to understand how to make itself to be more resilient in service to humanity.

I don’t think understanding physicians should be a prerequisite for receiving compassionate care. However/and, in working to lead with physicians or create the physicians of tomorrow, a little understanding goes a long way.

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Just Read: Current Science on Consumer Use of Mobile Health for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Just Read: Current Science on Consumer Use of Mobile Health for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Catching up on my reading…as this American Heart Association (@American_Heart) Scientific Statement was published in 2015, however it’s very exhaustive. And even more skeptical than I am about these things.

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Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

Just Read: Why Eating Fat May Not Make You Fat (The Big Fat Surprise)

For some reason, I have always had a keen interest in my personal health – I took nutritional sciences courses in college before I went to medical school, something only a few of us pre-med students did.

To this day, I still remember a curious statement in my Pathology textbook (and while writing this post, I confirmed that it was there, as of the 2005 Edition). It said:

Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis: Lesser, Uncertain, or Nonquantitated: High carbohydrate intake

I thought that was strange since we, and all of America, were/are being told to indulge in a high carbohydrate diet.

This book, by Nina Techolz, develops that theme in exquisite detail. Continue reading→

Just Read: I’m in the 10% (who still wears their fitness tracker)

Just Read: I'm in the 10% (who still wears their fitness tracker)

This is a randomized-controlled study (link here, paywalled) of “modern” wearable that has been widely reported (here, and here, among other places, with a “we told you so” tone). It casts doubt on the effectiveness of fitness trackers to promote physical activity and health.
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Just Read: Listening to Physiology instead of a Wearable for Weight Loss

Just Read: Listening to Physiology instead of a Wearable for Weight Loss

After reading the study about the impact of (a certain type of) wearable devices on weight loss (See: Just Read: Study – Wearables don’t improve weight loss – can you outrun a bad diet? ) – answer, not much – I also read this study at the same time that focused on exercise and diet in a very different way, and had much different outcomes.
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Just Read: Study – Wearables don’t improve weight loss – can you outrun a bad diet?

Just Read: Study - Wearables don't improve weight loss - can you outrun a bad diet?

“When I wore an exercise tracker, it DEmotivated me…” – quote from attendee at recent convening.

This study published in JAMA a few weeks ago (September, 2016), produced the unexpected (and curious) results.

Overweight and obese randomized to receive wearable devices as part of a weight loss program gained back more weight than users who did not receive wearables, after an initial 6 month weight loss.

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Just Read: Room For Change – Levels of Discrimination in Retail Stores Based on Gender Identity and Race

Just Read: Room For Change - Levels of Discrimination in Retail Stores Based on Gender Identity and Race

Out of 60 in-person tests conducted across D.C., Maryland and Virginia, 75 percent of gender identity testers experienced adverse, differential treatment compared to their cis-gendered counterparts. Adverse differential treatment included differences in quality, quantity or content of services provided to the testers.

Similarly, of the 60 tests, 40 percent of gender identity testers experienced a negative interaction, including but not limited to verbal harassment, rude service, refusal to assist and being followed by an employee or security.

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